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This week, Make the Road Nevada celebrated National Latino Conservation Week by partnering with organizations: Chispa, Somos Votantes, the Fifth Sun Project, and more in Las Vegas to get our community to work together and shine a spotlight on conservation.

Latino Conservation Week is an initiative that was created back in 2014 by the Hispanic Access Foundation. Over the years, this has become an inspiring movement to encourage the Latinx community to go outdoors and participate in activities that help our madre tierra. 

This year, we participated in events to engage the community with the outdoors—including their local parks. 

On July 21st, Chispa Nevada organizers, MRNV, and staff hosted “Semillas Con Chispa,” a gardening 101 workshop where people were able to come learn about gardening while conserving water. 

We also partnered with Somos Votantes, the Fifth Sun Project, and other organizations on July 23rd to host a park clean up at Lewis Family Park in East Las Vegas.  

“I encourage everyone to continue celebrating Latino Conservation daily and continue striving to conserve our madre tierra’s natural resources,” said our Environmental Justice Organizer, Jose “Josie” Rivera. 

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For more information about our efforts during Latino Conservation Week, the EROS project, and more, please contact Rivera at jose.rivera@maketheroadnv.org today!

 

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Make the Road Nevada’s Youth Power Project is demanding clean water from the Clark County School District through their newest campaign, Water Access For All

Youth Justice Organizer, Kathia Sotelo-Calderon and YPP members are fighting for equitable access to clean water, highlighting the risks of water-related health concerns; some of these risks include diarrhea, dysentery, and hepatitis A. According to their latest statement, with poor water quality, attendance and student health are at high risk of decline.

“As a student, it frustrates and scares me that millions of youth in the United States are impacted by lead poisoning,” said high school student and YPP fellow, Mia Albright. “Lower income regions are disproportionately impacted, as well. We deserve better.”

In effort to uplift their message, the YPP dedicated their Art in Action Night on March 22nd, 2022 to Water Access For All and World Water Day, encouraging students to raise clean water awareness through painting. Their efforts don’t stop there, though—they’re taking Water Access For All on a more musical scale next month.

On April 1st, 2022, the YPP will be attending singer-songwriter Billie Eilish’s Las Vegas concert to spread awareness and recruit potential YPP members. The youth group will be handing out pledge cards and stickers in honor of their Water Access For All campaign.

Want to learn more about the importance of clean water in schools? Please visit https://www.yourethecure.org/water-access and contact our Youth Justice Organizer, Kathia Sotelo-Calderon today.

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Are you 14-21, living in Nevada? Do you care about the issues in your community? Do you want to make a difference? If so, join the Youth Power Project! Visit the following link today: bit.ly/artnightypp

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Catch the latest Youth Power Project updates by following them on @youthpowerprojectnv on Tiktok and Instagram, and on twitter @YPPNV!

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This past Monday was National Recycling Day and some of us don’t take recycling into consideration on this day but every day.  What can be recycled? And where? It can take form in the simplest things we do.

 

And some of us don’t take recycling into consideration on this day but every day.

Many of us in the community want to do better for the environment but lack the resources to do so. 

 

“Sometimes, when I do cleaning work, in the parts of Las Vegas that show a higher economic level, there is more care to the trees, to the vegetation, and above all, it is noticeable in the difference of recycling programs, to those of our working communities. We should have access to those same resources because that is not equality.” – Fary Canales, MRNV member of the Environmental Justice Committee

 

The Nevada community should have access to those resources. While this issue needs to be addressed, we plan to help the community with what we can at this very moment. 

 

 

 

What can be recycled?

First, before starting to recycle, what can we reuse?

We can reuse containers from butter, sour cream, marinara sauce, the list goes on. Some of us already do this, and we can recycle gift wrap by reusing it. Other objects that can be recycled are bottles, cardboard, clothes, and even electronics. 

 

 

 

So, where can I recycle?

http://www.nevadastaterecycle.com/

https://www.republicservices.com/

For clothing, you can donate to a local goodwill

 

 

Now, we can’t forget water. 

Water is an essential source for all of us. We take it for granted and forget that it can disappear one day if we aren’t careful with our consumption. There are ways to help, though! We take shorter showers or note the amount of time our sprinklers are on to save water. We can do our laundry only when it is necessary. There are many more ways to help conserve water.

http://www.projectwater.info/100-ways-to-conserve-water.html

Are you interested in making a change to better the environment in your Las Vegas community? Join our environmental justice committee, contact:

Alejandro Montes
El/Ellos/He/They
858-649-9889

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“Remember saving and reusing plastic bags? Remember not being able to leave the table until you finished all of your dinners? These things are all methods of conservation”

 

This last week we turned our attention to Latinx Conservation Week. We had candid conversations about the impact of climate change and our place within the environmental justice space. We took a deep dive into the ways that climate impacts our community and how we impact the climate in our daily lives. We explored the valley and took action all week to get into nature and to give back to the environment that cares for us. We joined partners across the country to bring awareness to the many aspects of the environment that need our protection and support. 

 

Our gente is directly impacted by climate change, but we are busy worrying about other immediate things and we don’t think about the environmental impact of our actions too often, however, there are so many things that we already do within our Latinx community that folks overlook as being methods of conservation. We’ve been conservationists since childhood, but are only now understanding the full scope of impact that our little actions have. Remember the butter container? Remember saving and reusing plastic bags? Remember not being able to leave the table until you finished all of your dinners? These things are all methods of conservation; recycling old containers keeps them out of landfills and reduces the need/usage of fossil fuels that are needed to break that material down, finishing all of the food on your plate reduces the number of greenhouse gasses that are produced by the decaying process of your foods. 

 

Our gente is out in the streets on a daily basis making ends meet by selling flowers, elotes, and other goods. The heat is a direct indicator that our environment needs more help and the impact the heat has on our folks goes further than just a little sweat. Heat-related illnesses run rampant through our community during the summers and with so many folks without healthcare, this puts a strain on our health and on our families who depend on the income that comes from street vending. More can be done to protect our gente in the street and to protect our environment. Join our Facebook group to learn about more ways you can get involved in the environmental justice efforts and to learn more about the environment. 

 

We are having those conversations with our directly impacted community, take a look:

 

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