Exemple

Members and staff of Make the Road Nevada attended last week’s North Las Vegas City Council meeting in support of the new Dolores Huerta Resource Center— a community center aimed at opening doors for the Latinx community in the city. 

During the meeting, Serafin Calvo, Director of Community Services and Engagement for the City of North Las Vegas, along with Community Outreach Specialist Maggie Mora, gave a memorable presentation to the Mayor, City Council and large crowd in favor of the center. 

“The objective of this proposal is to educate and improve the quality of life, by identifying the barriers and replacing them with opportunities such as wellness programs that deal with mental, physical, and emotional health by helping them understand their rights  as well as creating a safe and educational environment,” said Mora. 

Those identifying as Latinx make up more than 41 percent of North Las Vegas’ population. This number continues to rise daily, and with that growth comes the need to provide a dedicated location for the Latinx community to receive assistance. Currently, there is no such resource in North Las Vegas.   

There are many barriers that this project aims to address, including but not limited to: lack of education; low graduation rates; low participation in civic engagement; lack of trust in the government and authorities; language barriers; lack of knowledge regarding one’s rights—  to name a few.  

The objectives of the Dolores Huerta Resource Center will be to focus on health and wellness, financial literacy, work development, recreation, arts and culture, educational workshops as well as after-school programs for Latinx youth. By making this investment, the city will be able to provide a long overdue place of trust for all Hispanic families.

Not only will this be a resource center, but rather a means to enrich the lives of some of the most vulnerable people in our community. 

“This is a hallmark moment for our city,” according to NLV Councilman Isaac E. Barron. 

At the conclusion of the presentation, Mayor John J. Lee and City Manager Ryann Juden said that the wheels were already in motion and the dream of the Dolores Huerta Resource Center would soon become a reality, and no other action was needed from the council or community. They hope that the center will be ready to open in early 2023.   

 

For more information, visit our website or contact Audrey Peral, Director of Organizing, by emailing audrey.peral@maktheroadnv.org

Read More →
Exemple

On Sunday, May 1st, Make the Road Nevada, CHISPA, the Culinary Union Local 226, the National Domestic Workers Alliance, members, and allies marched down the Las Vegas strip for immigrant workers, union labor, and for a pathway to citizenship. 

The member-led march accumulated about 100 attendees who started at the Bellagio Hotel & Casino’s fountains. We made our way through the influx of tourists and passersby in ‘Immigrants Are Essential’ shirts. Attendees also carried posters that read “Nothing Less Than Citizenship,” and “President Biden, Keep Your Promise,” in our beaming yellow and blue.

Our Immigration Justice Organizer, Rico Ocampo led the group alongside chant leaders: our Environmental Justice Organizer, Jose Rivera and our member leader, Edgardo. Collectively chanting: 

El pueblo unido, Jamas sera vencido The people united, Will never be defeated

________________

What do we want?, Citizenship When do we want it?, Now! Que Queremos? , Ciudadanía Cuando?, Ahora!

And more. As we finally approached the New York-New York Hotel & Casino’s Statue of Liberty, we circled around the statue as our MCs, Economic Justice Organizer, Abe Lugo and member leader, Fary took the mic to introduce the evening’s speakers. 

“In today’s program, you will hear the stories of workers, children of immigrants, and people directly affected by immigration policy,” said Lugo. 

 

Lugo and Fary welcomed Medinah Yusufzai, a first-generation Afghan American daughter of two Afghan refugees who escaped Afghanistan during the Soviet Union invasion and immigrated to the United States. They also welcomed Febe Rodriguez, a Culinary Union Local 226 member who was once undocumented by now uses her citizenship status to advocate for union labor laws and advocate by those directly impacted by immigration injustices. More speakers shared their stories, as well. 

Thank you to all those who attended the May Day and made this happen. A huge thank you to CHISPA, the Culinary Union Local 226, the National Domestic Workers Alliance, and your members.  

Thank you to Artkore for printing our materials, including our shirts, posters, banners, and flyers. 

And special thank you to each and everyone of our members for this powerful, member-led march. 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Make the Road NV (@maketheroadnv)

Read More →
Exemple

We’re ending the month and beginning another with a bang at Make the Road Nevada. Starting on April 25th, we will be hosting our Blitz at the MRNV office, inviting staff and members for leadership and development training. 

The week-long event, which will end April 30th, will include a combination of classroom workshops and real field experience; these efforts will create confident and stronger community leaders in Nevada as we embark on the upcoming elections.

Training and workshops will be led by MRNV staff, ranging from our communications and civic engagement sectors to our organization sectors. Some of the topics that will be discussed include but are not limited to: housing, climate, fair scheduling and worker protections, immigration reform, and education. 

We are then continuing the momentum with our May Day march on the Las Vegas Strip on Sunday, May 1st. 

MRNV, the immigrant community, and allies will come together to celebrate immigrant workers and union labor—and to demand President Biden to deliver permanent relief for the millions  undocumented immigrants who call the United States home.

“May Day serves as a reminder that immigrant labor is one of the many ways immigrant communities contribute to this nation,” said Rico Ocampo, our Immigrant Justice organizer. “It’s important for families across the nation to march so their power and perseverance can be visible.” 

Please join MRNV on May Day at 6:00pm in front of the Bellagio fountains; we will be marching to the New York-New York Hotel & Casino’s Statue of Liberty. If you have any questions, please contact our Immigrant Justice organizer, Rico Ocampo at rico.ocampo@maketheroadnv.org

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Make the Road NV (@maketheroadnv)

Read More →
Exemple

Between February 28th and March 3rd, Make the Road Nevada visited Washington D.C. to take part in two rallies and to speak with Senator Catherine Cortez Masto’s and Representative Steven Horsford’s teams on immigration reform. Five MRNV members joined Rico Ocampo (Immigrant Justice Organizer), Itzel Hernandez (Health Equity Organizer), and Crystal Lugo (Digital Organizer) on the four-day trip, which began with the State of Our Lives rally on Monday. 

Hundreds united outside the White House on the eve of President Biden’s State of the Union Address, demanding Biden to keep his pre-presidential promises on immigration reform. Speakers across various organizations expressed their frustrations with the unkept promises—all feeling collectively cheated and disillusioned by the president.  The attendees urged the 46th president to grant citizenship to the 11 million undocumented people in the United States, and also demanded him to deliver solutions on healthcare and climate matters.

 

“Biden, shine light on those who have been forced into the shadows; shine light on our people and give us a permanent solution: citizenship,” shared MRNV member leader, Areli. 

“Biden, act on what we put you in office for,” shared Northern Nevada MRNV member leader, Edurne. 

On Wednesday, March 2nd, MRNV staff and members met with Senator Catherine Cortez Masto’s team to discuss her stance on immigration reform and ask for her support. MRNV members, Jose, Ben, and Amparo shared their stories with the senator’s team for the first time. MRNV member and Nevada teacher, Ben joined MRNV in alliance after witnessing his undocumented students struggle internally and externally due to their undocumented status. 

“School is already stressful enough,” shared Ben with the senator’s team. “Being undocumented in this country adds unnecessary stress onto them.” 

MRNV member leader and DACA recipient, Jose shared his story with Cortez Masto’s team and explained his disappointment over not feeling fully accepted by the only country he has ever called home. 

“I’m tired of living a temporary life,” said Jose. “I’m not asking for a handout—all I’m asking for is a pathway to citizenship.” 

MRNV member, Amparo shared her story about being an undocumented mother of three, circled by limitations and little-to-no support from the United States due to her status. 

“I’m here in front of you expressing my stress,” shared Amparo. “I’m asking you to listen to us and put your hand on your hearts—be in community with us.”

On March 3rd, MRNV joined organizations outside the ICE building for the Communities Not Cages rally. The attendees chanted for change—calling Biden out on his adoption of Trump-era anti-immigration policies and demanding for ICE and CBP to be defunded, for detention centers to be shut down, for people to be freed, and for deportations to be stopped. 

MRNV safely returned to Nevada on Thursday night, bringing back new experiences and a stronger fight with them. Thank you for visiting, team! 

______________________________________________________ 

Thank you, Senator Catherine Cortez Masto’s staff and Representative Steven Horsford’s staff, for speaking to our Nevada members and centering their voices.

______________________________________________________ 

Missed our Washington D.C. trip? Check us out on our Twitter @maketheroadnv to view our Washington tweets, and visit our Instagram @maketheroadnv to view our Washington story highlight!

 

Read More →
Exemple

Make the Road Nevada staff and members visited Washington D.C. Dec. 6 through Dec. 8 to attend the We Can’t-Wait march, press conferences, and meet with Nevada Senators—all to demand the Senate to include a pathway to citizenship in the Build Back Better Act. 

Rico Ocampo, our Immigrant Justice Organizer, and Crystal Lugo, our digital organizer, along with Make the Road members Areli Sanchez, an undocumented member, and Edurne Gonzalez, a DACAmented Reno-based member joined Make the Road States and other immigrant advocacy groups on Tuesday’s march. 

The march, which began at Union Station, called for a pathway to citizenship, good care jobs, access to childcare and universal preschool education, paid family leave, green infrastructure, healthcare for all, and affordable housing. Along with thousands, our Nevada family chanted all the way down to Taft Memorial Park, an area next to the United States Capitol. 

Two press conferences were held at Taft Memorial; the first press conference featured many of those directly impacted; they shared their stories and frustrations in front of thousands. Congresspeople like Congresswoman Jan Schakowsky, Congressman Lou Correa, and Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley spoke. 

 

At the second press conference, new voices joined to support citizenship in the BBB, including United States Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, United States Representative Chuy García, and other House Democrats. 

Our very own Areli Sanchez was introduced by Nevada Congresswoman Dina Titus; Sanchez shared her story and asked those in power to deliver a pathway to citizenship this holiday season. We are so proud of your outstanding braveness, Areli! 

On Dec. 8, Ocampo, Lugo, Gonzalez, and Sanchez met with Nevada Senator Catherine Cortez-Masto’s staff and directly with Nevada Senator Jacky Rosen to discuss immigration and for members to share their stories. 

“I’m tired of fighting for my family and my community and only getting breadcrumbs,” said Gonzalez to Senator Catherine Cortez-Masto’s staff. “Effort is not enough—effort alone did not earn me my degree.” Gonzalez is the head of the household and holds a master’s degree in biotechnology from the University of Nevada, Reno.

Gonzalez also highlighted the need to help all undocumented—not just youth—and support undocumented Latinx women in STEM. Thank you for sharing your story with our Nevada Senators and Make the Road Nevada, Edurne. We admire you immensely. 

The team handed our members’ letters, which were penned during a member meeting, to Senator Catherine Cortez-Masto’s and Senator Jacky Rosen’s staff, respectively. The letters were written by Argentinian, Columbian, Mexican, and Chinese immigrants urging the Senators to deliver a pathway to citizenship. 

Thank you, Senator Catherine Cortez-Masto’s staff and Senator Jacky Rosen, for speaking to our Nevada members and centering their voices. 

 

______________________________________________________

 

Missed our Washington D.C. trip? Check us out on our Twitter @maketheroadnv to view our Washington tweets, and visit our Instagram @maketheroadnv to view our Washington story highlight!

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Make the Road NV (@maketheroadnv)

Read More →
Exemple

Make the Road Nevada was present at the Dia de Los Muertos with Yo Soy 132 event at Gary Reese Freedom Park last week, November 1st and 2nd, 2021. Our Digital Organizer, Crystal Lugo photographed these beautiful women painted like Catrinas as they took part in a contest.

The event was decorated with ofrendas and little girls dressed wearing traditional Mexican huipiles in the spirit of the celebration.

Check these images out of the event!

 

 

 

Read More →
Exemple

We want to congratulate these young people who have joined UNLV’s student government this semester as they embark on their journeys to create a more inclusive campus. 

Young People, when informed and empowered, 

when they realize that what they do truly make 

a difference, can indeed change the world.” 

-Jane Goodall

 

Many young people are inclined to think they do not have a voice. There’s a saying that those who don’t have a voice are spoken for by someone else, mostly someone who has power. 

 

“Every single person, every individual HAS a voice, but they aren’t being heard or listened to,” says Maryam Raja, a first-generation American and Hijabi Muslim who was elected Senator for UNLV’s student government this fall semester.

 

She believes, and she knows how vital a diverse community is and how neglected their opinions and ideas are. She hopes to change the narrative that there are people without voices, all of us have voices, and we have the will and power to make a change, no matter the background one may come from. By being part of the student body, she feels she can reflect the change for all students. Instead of using her position to expand her resume for herself, her reasons to be active in the student body are to solve issues with student leaders and be a representative of the diverse student body. Maryam knows people can take a step forward in their community to make the changes they want to see. Some of the changes Maryam has considered taking the initiative on are menstrual inequity, helping those with trouble obtaining feminine hygiene products. She also plans to implement a transportation waiver system that will allow students to commute to and from campus, relieving them from financial issues. Another plan is to create a support system for students affected by the pandemic through a workshop.

 

Another young student, Abraham Lugo, Vice President of UNLV’s student government, a DACA recipient, who is bisexual, has stated he will never forget where he came from and has accomplished having undocumented students be seen. 

“No matter what I do, or position I am in, or who I’m advocating for, it makes it impossible for me as a representative, as a person, to forget who I am.”

In this generation of labels, Abraham thanks his parents, for giving him the morals he has today. For him, it has been a struggle with all of the barriers that being an immigrant but he has never considered as a block in his path. Abraham took notice of how there were no scholarships for undocumented students. So he took the initiative to write legislation, and now there are scholarships for undocumented individuals at UNLV. 

 

Both of these fantastic young people of color will continue to remember their roots and use their identities as tools to bring the community together. Their voices and the need to make changes for the student body will lead them to do far greater things for the future.

Read More →
Exemple

Three days filled with actions took place in the past few weeks in Washington, DC. Each day was filled with the storytelling of directly impacted folks who have bravely fought for their rights in each of their respective states. Now, we have all joined forces yet again, as we have in years past, to demand a pathway to citizenship for all the 11 million people who currently reside in the United States. Decades of activism and sacrifice have culminated to this very point in history. Our gente are chanting, singing, dancing, and telling their stories in hopes that our elected officials listen to them instead of an unelected position whose opinion is simply that, an opinion. 

 

Our team went to DC and marched and chanted in an effort to have their voices transcend through the walls of the capitol and into the ears of the elected officials whose promises have fallen flat. Our team returned with a sense of anger and empowerment:

 

“It was both empowering and angering to be a part of the movement in the fight for citizenship for all. I saw many others doing the same as me. Walking miles in the sun, holding signs, loudly chanting while dehydrated. But we never gave up.

 

 It was sad because I know the politicians we were directing our chants to, were in an office with air conditioning or at home with their families, feeling secure. 

 

We work so hard to be heard but we’re being ignored right now.” -Kathia Sotelo Calderon, a DACA recipient who came to the states at the young age of just 7 years old. 

 

“Lobbying in Washington D.C. as an undocumented person gave me a sense of assertiveness, a right to have a public existence in a country that does not consider me part of its fabric, at least on paper. I have been living in the United States for 30 years and still do not have status. However, the impact of going to the capital of the United States of America will stay with me forever. 

 

And if in the process, we get something done, it won’t be because the governing powers wanted it, it will be because we organized and forced our government to fulfill our true needs.

 

It takes a lot of courage to come out of the shadows and tell the whole world that you are undocumented, it takes even more courage to get on a plane, travel over 2,000 miles, and demand to members of congress that they render you visible and fulfill their promise of providing citizenship for millions. That is agency.” -Rico Ocampo, a DACA recipient who came to the states at the young age of 3 years old. 

 

The fight won’t stop until our gente have access to a pathway to citizenship! Our people are fighting. Our people have fought for decades. They are true Americans. They are true champions. When the people rise up, the government trembles.

 

Read More →
Exemple

Let’s get something straight: Immigrants are people too. They have needs. They have families. They are in search of a better life. The situation currently happening along the Southern Border with Haitian migrants is a crisis. A crisis that needs compassion and humanity to be at the forefront of all the efforts to help migrants. The United States, The American Dream, everything that this nation claims to stand for – inclusivity, a life with dignity and respect, the ability to move freely and have a safe home to live in – this is what migrants coming to our country long for.

“Give me your tired, your poor,

Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,

The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.

Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,

I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”  – Emma Lazarus, 1883 

This sonnet calls to the world and as a nation. The United States accepted this obligation many years ago but now when our fellow man has come to our shores, we turn them away and meet them with racism and disrespect. 

Throughout history, the Haitian people have been used as pawns in political and social games and have grown distrustful of those who claim to want to help. Currently, the island and all its people are still living in the wake of the assassination of the President earlier this year. Now, the people are not only facing these struggles but also environmental challenges. The island has been riddled with earthquake after the earthquake along with tropical storms. Even though all of these things have happened, the island and its people still sing, they still dance, they still live. 

As they come to the United States, we must remember the help our families needed when they came from their homelands. Immigrants are people. As many organizations and many folks reach out to the community in an effort to help, let’s remind each other that Haitians are a strong community. That they, just like our families that came here before them, will make our existing communities stronger and more vibrant. 

Read More →
Exemple

How far have you gone to protect your family? How far would you travel? Who would you face to ensure that your children could spend another day with you?

Well, our gente has traveled miles. They have faced police and entire administrations to defend themselves and to fight for their neighbors. They have braved an entire country that criminalizes and dehumanizes them and their experiences to provide for their families on a daily basis. After so long, they continue. They continue to fight. They continue to raise their voices. They refuse to be defeated. 

This week the Parliamentarian ruled against creating a pathway to citizenship. With this ruling folks all over the political process believe that the fight for citizenship is over, but our gente does not take no for an answer. Our gente is taking to the streets of DC this week to welcome back congress after their recess. Their welcome consists of marches outside the capitol and around DC. Chants are ricocheting from the walls and windows of the capital city because our people can’t wait another year.  Our people are uniting across the country to fight for each other. To fight for security. To fight for their right to live a life of dignity and with respect. 

From Nevada, Rico, Lalo, Areli, and Marvin are joining their voices to the call for our elected officials to develop a new plan in which millions of people in the states have a path to citizenship.

Rico, a DACA recipient, a father, a husband, a friend, has dedicated his life to the cause, to organizing his community into participating in the political process to ensure that the political process truly reflects the interests of the people.

Lalo, a DACA recipient, a father, a friend, a partner, works day in and day out to ensure that his community has access to fair housing conditions and is treated fairly by their landlords while also fighting to educate the community on their rights.

Arieli, a mother, a partner, an immigrant, came to the states in search of safety. Her search for safety led her to a space where she can use her story and her voice to educate others and to advocate for a more inclusive and more secure future for everyone in her community.

Marvin, a friend, a son, an advocate, has used his voice in school board meetings and in demonstrations to advocate for the rights of students and their families. 

These powerful, educated, passionate voices are marching, demonstrating, and like Rep. John Lewis said, ‘getting into good trouble’ in DC. Their voices, their strength is a direct result of the support of the community. Nevada has a very large Latinx population and with that collective strength, they march on. From Nevada, we wish them peace, protection, and good vibes as they march for our rights. In Nevada, we will be cheering them on as they make history during Latinx Heritage Month. El Pueblo Unido Jamas Sera Vencido! Si Se Puede!

Read More →
EnglishSpanishPortuguese