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As we slowly begin to inch our way towards this season’s local elections, your familia at Make the Road Nevada wants to provide you with all of the information regarding how to prepare for the primaries, how to register to vote and more. 

We have partnered with three organizations: the American Civil Liberties Union, Silver State Voices and All Voting is Local, who have provided us with more detailed information to make this process easier for you. 

“Voting is the cornerstone of our democracy and democracy truly works when everyone has access to the ballot box,”  said Sadmira Ramic, an American Civil Liberties Union staff attorney. “It is a fundamental right for a reason—without it, our country, states and communities would not be representative of its citizens. At times it might seem like one individual’s vote does not matter, but that could not be further from the truth.” 

It’s important that before you cast your ballot, you are informed of your rights, what the process will look like and who the candidates of this critical election are. Individuals should research political and social issues as well as the candidates and their work before making a decision.

Over the years there have been a series of election bills passed to make it easier for all Nevadans to access the ballot boxes. There are several steps to take to ensure that you and anyone else who qualifies, can vote in this year’s election, where and how. The first step: register to vote. 

How to Register to Vote

Voters can register to vote online using the Nevada Secretary of State’s website: https://www.nvsos.gov/SOSVoterServices/start.aspx

Here you can also update or cancel any existing voter registration. If you prefer not to register online, you can also register to vote by filling out a mail-in voter registration form and mailing it to the county clerk/register provided here: https://www.nvsos.gov/SOSVoterRegForm/home.aspx

Three Ways to Vote:

  1. Vote by Mail-In Ballot
  2. Vote Early 
  3. Go to a Vote Center on Election Day

What Do I Need to Register to Vote Online?

A current and valid Driver’s License or an Identification Card issued by the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles.

If you are unable to provide either of these, you must register in person with your county election office or mail in a paper application. 

What Do I Need in Person to Register Same-Day?

  • Current and Valid Nevada Driver’s License
  • Proof of Residency
  • A Nevada DMV “Interim Document”

Where Can I Vote?

Clark County: 

Primary Early Voting Centers: Early Voting Schedule: Saturday, May 28th through Friday, June 10th

* Hours Vary Depending on Location

Here is a list of all voting centers in Clark County:

https://www.nvsos.gov/sos/home/showpublisheddocument/10516/637872644357300000

Other Important Dates in Clark County: 

Wednesday, May 25th: Deadline for the Start of Mailing of In-State Ballots

  • Must be ready to distribute no later than 20 days before election for in-state voters.

Saturday, May 28th through Friday June 10th: Early Voting

  • Anyone registered to vote in Clark County can vote at any early voting site in the county.

Tuesday, May 31st: Last Day to Opt-In Again to Vote by Mail

Saturday, June 14th: Election Day

Washoe County:

Primary Early Voting Centers: Early Voting Schedule

Saturday, May 28th through Friday, June 10th. 

All Locations 10:00am to 6:00pm 

Here is a list of all voting centers in Washoe County: https://www.nvsos.gov/sos/home/showpublisheddocument/10550/637879634585070000

Important Dates Washoe County

Wednesday, May 18th through Tuesday, June 14th: Online Only Extended Standard Registration

  • Register to vote or update existing registration online.

Wednesday, May 25th: Deadline for the Start of Mailing of In-State ballots

  • Must be ready to distribute no later than 20 days before election for in-state voters.

Saturday, May 28th through Friday, June 10th: Early Voting

  • Anyone registered to vote in Washoe County can vote at any early voting site in the county.

Wednesday, June 1st through Friday, June 10th: In Person/Online & Same Day Registration

  • Register to vote in-person at any early voting site on Election Day

Saturday, June 14th: Election Day

If You Face Any Voting Issues Before or On Election Day, Please Contact These Hotlines: 

  1. 1-866-OUR-VOTE (English) 
  2. 1-888-VE-Y-VOTA (Spanish)

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To register through Make the Road Nevada, please visit our office at 4250 E Bonanza Rd Suite 14 & 20, Las Vegas, NV 89110. Please also feel free to contact our Jessica Padrón, our Civic Engagement Director (jessica.padron@maketheroadnv.org) or our Democracy Specialist, Alexander Guerrero-Torres (alex.guerrero@maketheroadnv.org) if you have any questions or would like additional information. 

 

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As the Primary election season approaches, Make the Road Nevada wants to ensure you’re registered and informed so your voice is heard. Before you go to the polls, keep reading to learn how MRNV is getting the community registered and ready, and learn more about the primaries, your voting rights, and key dates to write on your calendar today.

This spring, we’re expanding our voting registration efforts in various locations across East Las Vegas, including local businesses, high schools, and Latinx neighborhoods. 

“By touching on several hemispheres of social life, our organization strives to ensure that the entire community of East Las Vegas has access to the information constituents need to feel empowered, knowledgeable, and confident to vote,” said Alex Guerrero, Make the Road Nevada’s Democracy Specialist. “Understanding the crucial role that voting plays in each individual’s life is the only way to most effectively project our voices as a pueblo.”

Key Dates: 

Early voting begins on May 28th, 2022 to June 10th, 2022, and the official Primary election date is June 14th, 2022. 

Primary Basics 

What Are They, Anyway? 

The primaries are the elections that allow political parties to determine the candidate who will go onto later elections to represent them. Nevada is a closed primary state, which means only party-registered voters may vote. 

“Due to the low voting turnout during primaries, it is indispensable that our community exercise its right to vote in order to choose leaders that will best understand, acknowledge, and act on the issues that ceaselessly concern Latinx and working-class communities,” said Guerrero. 

 Can I Vote? 

Before you vote in the —it’s important to know who can vote in the state of Nevada.

  1. You must be a United States Citizen 
  2. Be a resident of the United States for 30 days prior to the election 
  3. Be 18 years old—or turning 18 by the election 
  4. Not have been declared “non-compos mentis” or “mentally incompetent” by a court of law
  5. Have not been convicted of a felony—or have, but have had your rights restored. (Nevada does remove voting rights for people with felony convictions. The right to vote is automatically restored upon release from prison.)

How Do I Register? 

You can register to vote in person—through as, as well—or by person. You must register at least 28 days before the election. Want to register online? You must be registered by the Thursday before the election you wish to vote in.

Know Your Voting Rights and Make Your Vote Count 

Stay in Line: If you’re in line but the polls are closing, stay in line! You still have the right to vote.

Create a Voting Plan: Make sure you find a location near you, and make sure to review their hours beforehand.

If You’re Not On the List at the Polls: You may cast a provisional ballot, which is verified by election officials and counted after it’s clear you’re qualified and registered to vote.

Mail-in Ballots: Registered voters will be sent a mail ballot. mailing will begin no later than 20 days before Election Day for in-state voters; no later than 40-45 days for out-of-state voters. No mail ballot packet by early voting? Call the Election Department at (702) 455-VOTE (8683) or email MailBallotRequest@ClarkCountyNV.gov

Do You Feel Targeted at Your Polling Place? There are laws protecting your decision to share who you voted for. You have the protected right to a private vote if you don’t feel safe. It is a federal crime to intimidate, threaten, or coerce anyone into voting for a particular candidate. To report intimidation at the polls, call The Election Protection Hotline: 1-866-OUR-VOTE or

1-888-VE-Y-VOTA (en Español).

Oh, no! Made A Mistake? That’s okay! Simply ask a polling place worker for a new ballot.

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To register through Make the Road Nevada, please visit our office at 4250 E Bonanza Rd Suite 14 & 20, Las Vegas, NV 89110. Please also feel free to contact our Democracy Specialist, Alexander Guerrero-Torres (alex.guerrero@maketheroadnv.org) if you have any questions or would like additional information.

 

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We want to congratulate these young people who have joined UNLV’s student government this semester as they embark on their journeys to create a more inclusive campus. 

Young People, when informed and empowered, 

when they realize that what they do truly make 

a difference, can indeed change the world.” 

-Jane Goodall

 

Many young people are inclined to think they do not have a voice. There’s a saying that those who don’t have a voice are spoken for by someone else, mostly someone who has power. 

 

“Every single person, every individual HAS a voice, but they aren’t being heard or listened to,” says Maryam Raja, a first-generation American and Hijabi Muslim who was elected Senator for UNLV’s student government this fall semester.

 

She believes, and she knows how vital a diverse community is and how neglected their opinions and ideas are. She hopes to change the narrative that there are people without voices, all of us have voices, and we have the will and power to make a change, no matter the background one may come from. By being part of the student body, she feels she can reflect the change for all students. Instead of using her position to expand her resume for herself, her reasons to be active in the student body are to solve issues with student leaders and be a representative of the diverse student body. Maryam knows people can take a step forward in their community to make the changes they want to see. Some of the changes Maryam has considered taking the initiative on are menstrual inequity, helping those with trouble obtaining feminine hygiene products. She also plans to implement a transportation waiver system that will allow students to commute to and from campus, relieving them from financial issues. Another plan is to create a support system for students affected by the pandemic through a workshop.

 

Another young student, Abraham Lugo, Vice President of UNLV’s student government, a DACA recipient, who is bisexual, has stated he will never forget where he came from and has accomplished having undocumented students be seen. 

“No matter what I do, or position I am in, or who I’m advocating for, it makes it impossible for me as a representative, as a person, to forget who I am.”

In this generation of labels, Abraham thanks his parents, for giving him the morals he has today. For him, it has been a struggle with all of the barriers that being an immigrant but he has never considered as a block in his path. Abraham took notice of how there were no scholarships for undocumented students. So he took the initiative to write legislation, and now there are scholarships for undocumented individuals at UNLV. 

 

Both of these fantastic young people of color will continue to remember their roots and use their identities as tools to bring the community together. Their voices and the need to make changes for the student body will lead them to do far greater things for the future.

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It’s no secret that there is a discrepancy between the level of health care that communities of color receive compared to that of their white counterparts, however, this reality raises more questions than just ‘why?’. How can we fill the gap? Where can our gente turn to for quality healthcare that at the same time makes them feel safe and welcome? How can our general community members get involved to ensure that their neighbors and loved ones are being taken care of by healthcare providers who genuinely care about their patients? 

 

The answers to these questions do not solely lie on the laps of elected officials. Like most things in life, it takes a village. It takes folks who care to take to the streets and advocate for the things they need in their communities. Access to grocery stores with fresh food, access to specialized medical professionals, accessible medical information in native languages, all these things and so much more come into play when our gente’s health is in question.  

 

Folks who live in urban areas, near highways, or in traditionally underfunded areas of cities are often times the same folks who do not have access to fresh food, or specialized medical professionals in their areas. 

 

These are our realities, but what can we do? Uplift the voices of the community who are directly impacted by health inequity, elected officials who actually grew up int eh areas they are representing so they can act on the things they personally know are missing in their communities. When we get folks into power, we must hold them accountable. 

 

Health equity is a complex topic that directly impacts people of color. The solutions cannot come without the community’s involvement. 

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A group of our gente joined together on July 2nd, 2021 at the doorstep of the Federal Building in Downtown Las Vegas to call for citizenship for all. Our elected officials, on their campaign trails and during their time in office have claimed to be champions of the people. They have posed for photos and have given half-hearted speeches about the importance of unity in difficult times. Our community has been united for decades in the call for citizenship. They have waited long enough for a system to be reformed to favor them and their families. During the pandemic, a slogan has been paraded around with no backing; the road to recovery, as of this moment, seems like it will be paved by our own community, but won’t include them. A direct pathway to citizenship for the 11 million people who have worked to keep our communities going and who have gone the extra mile in educating our children during a global pandemic needs to happen now.

During the rally, we heard the story of Karla, a DACA recipient, who had to watch as her parents suffered the consequences of the separation from their families. We heard the story of Areli who immigrated for her own safety from her home country. Lalo shared his story of the anxiety he and his daughter feel on account of the insecurity that his status brings. Erika shared her story of power, fear, and courage.

They are true American heroes who fight every day for their right to live with dignity and respect. We stand with them. We will fight alongside them. We will continue to push our elected officials to stay true to their campaign trail promises and create a path to citizenship for the 11 million who call this land their home. We are home.

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Our gente are our gente. That being said, this Immigrant Heritage Month and PRIDE Month, we want to recognize the queer immigrants who are fighting for justice alongside us. Their stories are intertwined with the collective immigrant story and they should be heard and told. 

 

Our community faces a lot of challenges regarding race, money, and systematic oppression, but when it comes to queer immigrants these challenges are magnified. By pushing through the exclusion and intolerance they fight to break through on the side of dignity and respect. Fighting for basic human rights and [having them denied] constantly dealing with the confusion and the exclusion that comes with being queer and an immigrant. 

 

The right to a liveable wage and the right to a home is oftentimes not attainable for queer folks, even more so for queer immigrants. According to the American Progress, 15% of trans folks have reported making less than $10,000 a year and gay men earn 10-32% less than heterosexual men with similar qualifications and education levels. 

 

Queer youth, at a young age, also experience the challenges of being queer in regards to mental health and accessibility to resources. According to NBC News, 2 in every 5 queer youth have ‘seriously considered suicide in the past year highlighting the need for more mental health resources among our queer youth. 

 

LGBTQIA+ issues, not only happen in the U.S. but in many countries identifying as queer is life-threatening. Queer folks apply for asylum in hopes of escaping the dangers of their homelands where honor killings and queer shame are the norms. Watch one of the many queer asylum seeker stories below, then watch the second video about the process which LGBTQIA+ folks must go through in order to reach Asylum in the U.S.

Resources

 

 

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Governor Sisolak anticipates a complete reopening of COVID-19 mitigation requirements by June 1st. “Based on consultation with our state health officials, I am pleased to announce that I’m very confident every county in the state of Nevada, will be able to fully reopen at 100 percent capacity by June 1,” He announced in a press conference.

As proposed by the Clark County Commission on April 20, capacity restrictions for public gatherings will be increased to 80 percent effective May 1, distance requirements will be reduced from six to three feet, and nightclubs may reopen.

Restaurants

Restaurants are now allowed to extend their capacity limits to 80 percent, still urging the public to follow proper CDC guidelines.

Grocery stores

If self-service salad bars, salsa bars, olive bars, condiment stations, and bulk food bins are supervised by an employee, hand sanitizer is provided, service utensils are changed out every hour, and patrons and employees have separated appropriately, they could return. If samples are consumed, face covers must be replaced right away.

Casinos

As long as licensed gaming establishments in Nevada are licensed, the Nevada Gaming Control Board will have jurisdiction over their gaming areas, including gaming floors.

Buffets

Self-serve buffets can reopen if they are supervised by an employee, if hand sanitizer is available to patrons, and if service utensils are changed every hour.

Adult entertainment

All employers must provide face coverings to employees, and employees must wear them, and all patrons must wear them when not actively eating, drinking, or smoking, a policy no different from the current requirements at restaurants and bars. At 50 percent capacity, the business must provide workers, customers, and visitors with places to wash their hands, including frequent and thorough hand washing. The gentlemen’s club must provide routine cleaning and disinfection of surfaces and equipment and conduct daily surveys of staff health conditions.

Nightclubs

Maximum occupancy for a nightclub is 50 percent. All employers and employees must wear face coverings when not eating, drinking, or smoking, and every patron must wear a face covering when not actively eating, drinking, or smoking. A business must encourage frequent and thorough hand washing, as well as providing workers, customers, and worksite visitors with a place to wash their hands. Nightclubs are required to offer routine cleaning and disinfecting of surfaces and equipment with EPA-approved cleaning chemicals and conduct daily surveys of staff health conditions. Dance floors are prohibited if social distancing requirements are applicable.

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On April 7th, the Youth Power Project and Make the Road took the Clark County District Building to rally for police-free schools. Led by the powerful voices of directly impacted youth, the message was clear; “We are directly affected by the police presence on campus. Schools are a place of learning, not a place for the police” (Ivana, YPP). 

 

Tensions rose with the increasing heat fueled by the importance of the message and the courage of those who spoke out. Students used their resources and platforms to bring a difficult conversation to the District’s doorstep that serves them. Their voices chanted Education NOT Incarceration, and their chants hit heavy against the windows of the District Building as onlookers listened from inside. Receiving offensive efforts from counter-protestors, our youth stood their ground and demanded to be heard with courage and power. 

 

Here’s the issue | The latest available budget data shows that CCSD spent $18.4 million on salaries and benefits for members of the district’s police department in 2018–2019.35 While the district has 161 sworn law enforcement officers and 41 civilian officers, they are vastly under-staffed when it comes to nurses, social workers, psychologists, and school counselors. Aside from the monetary strain, the CCSD Police puts on our education system, the repeated violent offenses that police do to children ranging in age from Elementary school to High school need to end. 

 

Read the full report here.

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Nelly Tobon is a Make the Road NV member who works to empower women in our community. Learn more about her below. 

 

How did you first get involved with Make the Road? 

“I was looking for spaces in the community where I could participate. My husband and I have a club called Migrantes de Uruapan where we do cultural activities and little by little we have become more involved in activism, we can bring entertainment, do festivals, or organize dances and it is beautiful to be able to maintain our traditions. We still lack many things in the community, this is one of the reasons I have become involved with Make the Road Nevada. I started in Make the Road by attending the committee, Familias Unidas”.

What is  Metamorphosis?

“It is a conference that empowers women who seek gender equality as well as a little bit of feminism intertwined with the community as not being individual matters but being intertwined”. 

What are other topics that interest you and help you empower other women?

“I have also studied the energy of the female body, how to use the energy of the uterus every day, how to work with the heart, and how they work together to make us better. I also worked with a teacher, Miranda Gray, she has an event called the Blessing of the Uterus and she also has written books and has loads of information. I brought her to Las Vegas to give a workshop and she has always been in this movement as well. Lately, I have also been working on Mental Health and all that encompasses. I started this for myself because when I came to live in the United States I was depressed. I also had anxiety due to being new to this country and new to the language. Since I have my own experiences, I was able to walk into these spaces with experience and knowledge. This is one of the first things I would like to share with the community. I experienced it and so have many others”. 

As an immigrant woman, what would you recommend that other immigrant women do to help with these stressful times and other instances of difficulty experienced by immigrant women? 

“First of all, find a support network, whether it is relatives, having friends or/and acquaintances who can support you, who you can call and ask them for advice. It is helpful for example when they can take care of your children for an hour or so, so that you can go out for an appointment, or do whatever chores you may need to do that day. The thing you need first is a support network. My second advice is to make the effort to adapt to this country; learn to speak English, get a driver’s license, try to, little by little, be integrating into society as a good person. My third advice would be to get involved in the community, maybe not to become a full-time activist, but if it is to see what happens, what groups there are, what organizations are working for the community, and also get to know the people.

Do you have anything else you would like to express? 

I have always felt welcome at Make the Road, I love the meetings and miss them, being in person with everyone, and I have always felt supported and at ease, as I am always learning and hopefully I will always stay involved so that the organization continues to grow and as we reach more and more people. 

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Black History Month is much more than the material covered in public education. The stories run deeper than that of the textbook and of colorless photos of pain and strength. They are of powerful people who rose above their struggles, continue to fight for their right to live, breathe, be and flourish in a society preprogrammed to suppress and deny them their place in the world. 

 

To Erika Washington of Make it Work Nevada, Black History Month was a time to study a ‘distant’ history covering the ‘regular folks’ we all learned about in school, but with time and with life experiences reasoned that Black History is quotidian, an ever-growing reality of Black folks in our own time and in our own neighborhoods. Ruby Duncan, a mother of the welfare rights movement, who stormed Ceaser’s Palace in 1971 and is responsible for the accessible WIC programs in Las Vegas; Ruby is living history. There are so many other folks who have made an impact in our community whose stories aren’t told; Senator Joe Neal, Nevada’s 1st Black  Attorney General, Aaron Ford, Steven Horsford, the 1st Black Congressman in Nevada, the list is extensive and their stories imposing. They are all Black History who continue to make a mark on our community. Living history is precious, as a result, we become more appreciative of the here and now. We are surrounded by and a part of history.

Erika is living history. 

Michael Lyle is a local Journalist whose perspective of Black History focuses through two lenses; the first through a lens of being apart of Black History and the other as a Black Journalist; upon learning more about his own history and that of the many leaders through history has impacted him; their struggles, their sacrifices, their journeys each play a crucial part in the development of Michael. On this journey of discovery with the goal in mind being solely knowledge and truth, frustration and anger find their way to the surface as horrible truths are brought to light, and with this light, current events are made more clear.

Michael is living history.

Eden is an activist, YPP member, and empowered woman whose view of Black History Month is a journey, filled with events and people who, as one continues on the journey, impact the story and concern many groups of people from all over the world. Black History isn’t sanctioned to the United States but rather spans the entire world and impacts every group of people. Acknowledging this has lead to many changes in the way Eden presents, views, and establishes her presence in a space; using the power of the stories she has learned along the way, she uses her voice to bring forth real change within her community. She has spoken to individuals of power in the community and has used her voice to advocate for Black students across the state.

Eden is living history. 

Adam Johnson is a school leader whose efforts to educate young people about the power of their history and use history as a force of empowerment. At his institution, students are Black history throughout the year thus furthering the extent of the course material and allowing students the time to fully understand the impact of Black history. With the educating of young people he hopes that through instruction, these same young folks go into the world with the courage, self-confidence, and discipline to achieve big goals and to educate the rest of the community. Students are leaders in training, the responsibility of educating them should not be taken lightly, this is why Black history is taught alongside the general History courses, to help students see themselves as a part of this evergreen history.

Adam is living history.

We are all apart of this living history. We must educate ourselves and those around us about the true history of our nation and about the value of others to the collective American story.

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