fbpx
Exemple

On April 7th, the Youth Power Project and Make the Road took the Clark County District Building to rally for police-free schools. Led by the powerful voices of directly impacted youth, the message was clear; “We are directly affected by the police presence on campus. Schools are a place of learning, not a place for the police” (Ivana, YPP). 

 

Tensions rose with the increasing heat fueled by the importance of the message and the courage of those who spoke out. Students used their resources and platforms to bring a difficult conversation to the District’s doorstep that serves them. Their voices chanted Education NOT Incarceration, and their chants hit heavy against the windows of the District Building as onlookers listened from inside. Receiving offensive efforts from counter-protestors, our youth stood their ground and demanded to be heard with courage and power. 

 

Here’s the issue | The latest available budget data shows that CCSD spent $18.4 million on salaries and benefits for members of the district’s police department in 2018–2019.35 While the district has 161 sworn law enforcement officers and 41 civilian officers, they are vastly under-staffed when it comes to nurses, social workers, psychologists, and school counselors. Aside from the monetary strain, the CCSD Police puts on our education system, the repeated violent offenses that police do to children ranging in age from Elementary school to High school need to end. 

 

Read the full report here.

Read More →
Exemple
Nelly Tobon is a Make the Road NV member who works to empower women in our community. Learn more about her below. 

 

How did you first get involved with Make the Road? 

“I was looking for spaces in the community where I could participate. My husband and I have a club called Migrantes de Uruapan where we do cultural activities and little by little we have become more involved in activism, we can bring entertainment, do festivals, or organize dances and it is beautiful to be able to maintain our traditions. We still lack many things in the community, this is one of the reasons I have become involved with Make the Road Nevada. I started in Make the Road by attending the committee, Familias Unidas”.

What is  Metamorphosis?

“It is a conference that empowers women who seek gender equality as well as a little bit of feminism intertwined with the community as not being individual matters but being intertwined”. 

What are other topics that interest you and help you empower other women?

“I have also studied the energy of the female body, how to use the energy of the uterus every day, how to work with the heart, and how they work together to make us better. I also worked with a teacher, Miranda Gray, she has an event called the Blessing of the Uterus and she also has written books and has loads of information. I brought her to Las Vegas to give a workshop and she has always been in this movement as well. Lately, I have also been working on Mental Health and all that encompasses. I started this for myself because when I came to live in the United States I was depressed. I also had anxiety due to being new to this country and new to the language. Since I have my own experiences, I was able to walk into these spaces with experience and knowledge. This is one of the first things I would like to share with the community. I experienced it and so have many others”. 

As an immigrant woman, what would you recommend that other immigrant women do to help with these stressful times and other instances of difficulty experienced by immigrant women? 

“First of all, find a support network, whether it is relatives, having friends or/and acquaintances who can support you, who you can call and ask them for advice. It is helpful for example when they can take care of your children for an hour or so, so that you can go out for an appointment, or do whatever chores you may need to do that day. The thing you need first is a support network. My second advice is to make the effort to adapt to this country; learn to speak English, get a driver’s license, try to, little by little, be integrating into society as a good person. My third advice would be to get involved in the community, maybe not to become a full-time activist, but if it is to see what happens, what groups there are, what organizations are working for the community, and also get to know the people.

Do you have anything else you would like to express? 

I have always felt welcome at Make the Road, I love the meetings and miss them, being in person with everyone, and I have always felt supported and at ease, as I am always learning and hopefully I will always stay involved so that the organization continues to grow and as we reach more and more people. 

Read More →
Exemple

Black History Month is much more than the material covered in public education. The stories run deeper than that of the textbook and of colorless photos of pain and strength. They are of powerful people who rose above their struggles, continue to fight for their right to live, breathe, be and flourish in a society preprogrammed to suppress and deny them their place in the world. 

 

To Erika Washington of Make it Work Nevada, Black History Month was a time to study a ‘distant’ history covering the ‘regular folks’ we all learned about in school, but with time and with life experiences reasoned that Black History is quotidian, an ever-growing reality of Black folks in our own time and in our own neighborhoods. Ruby Duncan, a mother of the welfare rights movement, who stormed Ceaser’s Palace in 1971 and is responsible for the accessible WIC programs in Las Vegas; Ruby is living history. There are so many other folks who have made an impact in our community whose stories aren’t told; Senator Joe Neal, Nevada’s 1st Black  Attorney General, Aaron Ford, Steven Horsford, the 1st Black Congressman in Nevada, the list is extensive and their stories imposing. They are all Black History who continue to make a mark on our community. Living history is precious, as a result, we become more appreciative of the here and now. We are surrounded by and a part of history.

Erika is living history. 

Michael Lyle is a local Journalist whose perspective of Black History focuses through two lenses; the first through a lens of being apart of Black History and the other as a Black Journalist; upon learning more about his own history and that of the many leaders through history has impacted him; their struggles, their sacrifices, their journeys each play a crucial part in the development of Michael. On this journey of discovery with the goal in mind being solely knowledge and truth, frustration and anger find their way to the surface as horrible truths are brought to light, and with this light, current events are made more clear.

Michael is living history.

Eden is an activist, YPP member, and empowered woman whose view of Black History Month is a journey, filled with events and people who, as one continues on the journey, impact the story and concern many groups of people from all over the world. Black History isn’t sanctioned to the United States but rather spans the entire world and impacts every group of people. Acknowledging this has lead to many changes in the way Eden presents, views, and establishes her presence in a space; using the power of the stories she has learned along the way, she uses her voice to bring forth real change within her community. She has spoken to individuals of power in the community and has used her voice to advocate for Black students across the state.

Eden is living history. 

Adam Johnson is a school leader whose efforts to educate young people about the power of their history and use history as a force of empowerment. At his institution, students are Black history throughout the year thus furthering the extent of the course material and allowing students the time to fully understand the impact of Black history. With the educating of young people he hopes that through instruction, these same young folks go into the world with the courage, self-confidence, and discipline to achieve big goals and to educate the rest of the community. Students are leaders in training, the responsibility of educating them should not be taken lightly, this is why Black history is taught alongside the general History courses, to help students see themselves as a part of this evergreen history.

Adam is living history.

We are all apart of this living history. We must educate ourselves and those around us about the true history of our nation and about the value of others to the collective American story.

Read More →
Exemple

For Immediate Release:
July 21, 2020

Trump Doesn’t Want Undocumented Immigrants to Count in 2020 Census, Again.

Tuesday, July 21, 2020– President Trump released a memo this morning announcing his plans
to sign an Executive Order to exclude undocumented immigrants from being counted in the
2020 Census by limiting non-citizens from being included in population numbers for
congressional redistricting. His administration is using fear and intimidation to stop
undocumented immigrants from filling out the census to erase immigrants in this country. This
undercount in undocumented people will keep resources from communities that need them the
most.
This is yet another attempt to accomplish his xenophobic goals following the failed citizenship
question case last year. The Supreme Court struck down that last attempt to intimidate
undocumented immigrants from filling out the 2020 Census as unconstitutional. Congressional
representation is allocated based on the total peoples in a state, not just those eligible to vote.

Everyone who lives in the United States as of April 1, 2020, must be counted, the futures of our
families and communities depend on it.

As we face the COVID-19 pandemic, getting a full count is more crucial now than ever. A full,
accurate count means hospitals, food banks, and infrastructure for emergency responses. This
is a distraction from his continued failure in handling the COVID-19 pandemic.
“This is just a scare tactic to further marginalize our communities. Through our work with our
Censo y Cena events we have heard how mixed-status families fear accurately filling out the
Census because of the belief they’ll put their loved ones at risk of deportation regardless of the
laws in place to protect Census data. This disgusting executive order will just cause more fear
and confusion for undocumented communities.” Audrey Peral, MRNV Economic Justice
Organizer

Read More →
Exemple

A long history of segregation and racism has instilled systemic racism that in recent years has become even more prevalent due to the internet and sharing platforms. These issues are not sporadic or new, but they have always been. As a society, we now are banding together, regardless of differences, to reintroduce the conversation of racism and systemic racism to the country and to our friends and families. As allies, it is our duty to speak up when we hear or see something racist.

Black and Brown communities are more likely to die at the hands of law enforcement, however, the Black community is 2.5x more likely to be killed at the hands of law enforcement for even the simplest of infractions. In many cases, traffic stops have resulted in the deaths of members of the Black community.

Prejudices and racism begin at home. Racism is taught. To eradicate racism we must first begin with dialogue. Focusing on the deepest issues at hand and having honest conversations about the racist beliefs held by those around us. Have the difficult conversations, don’t be afraid to call your family and friends, and have this conversation when you hear something or see something they do to be racist. We must also elevate the voices of the community instead of speaking on their behalf. We are not their ambassadors, we are their allies and we are to stand by them and raise their arms and voices higher. Be an ally everywhere. Speak up against racism. 

For additional resources on how to start the conversation take a look below;

https://www.miamiherald.com/opinion/op-ed/article243375201.html 

https://nacla.org/news/2020/06/09/dismantling-anti-blackness-together 

Starting the conversation en Español

 

Read More →
Exemple

March 16th 2019

OFFICE TEMPORARILY CLOSED

The safety of our members and staff is our number one priority at Make the Road. Out of precautionary measures, and recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we will be redirecting our staff to work remotely for the week of March 16th and will temporarily close our office doors for the time being. We will continue to assess and monitor the health situation on a weekly basis.

We have put together a list of resources for anyone affected by recent events do to the COVIN-19. You can find those resources on our Resource page in English here and in Spanish here.

Please do not be alarmed as our mission of building the power of Latinx and working-class communities of color to achieve dignity and justice still continues. Our team will remain available to our community digitally through email amigxs@maketheroadnv.org or by phone. Leave a voicemail at (702) 907-1560 with your full name and best return contact information so that one of our organizers may call you back.

We will be sharing important resources on our social media and website to keep the community up to date with important information. We want to remind the community you are not alone and we are all here together.

¡El pueblo unido jamás será vencido! The people united will never be divided!

Read More →
EnglishPortugueseSpanish